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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
deep, deep, deep cuts in education and unemployment benefits and health insurance for the poor. they've even gone after preschool in the state, all policies that will pretty directly hit the shoppers at the pope family stores, right? bargain town, bill's dollar store, the super 10 the super dollar, treasure mart, roses, maxway, all of the dollar stores that are part of their empire, all of the discount dollar stores that have made art pope and his family all of their many millions, which they have now spent to go after the poor in north carolina in a way that nobody has in more than 100 years. today, the state's naacp held a news conference outside the state budget office, outside art pope's office, announcing a campaign targeting mr. pope's discount stores. they're calling it a picketing campaign to educate dollar store customers about what they called the extreme and aggressive policies that they are funding by shopping at stores owned by mr. pope. >> we want to put a stop to the use of wealth to influence policies in a negative way. that's why it's not a boycott, it's a picket. >>
, still straining under the shackles of apartheid. the government creates a new system of education. they force classes to be taught in aftrikans. the decision will prove disastrous. >> i was busy in my consulting rooms early morning of june the 16th, 1976. when i heard this hum, like the hum of bees. >> reporter: in the johannesburg township of soweto, students are marching against the new education measures. >> this is illegal. >> reporter: police are sent to quell the protests. they open fire on the students. >> from then on, soweto began to burn. >> reporter: news of the uprising spreads quickly throughout the country, as do other protests and riots. >> south africa was aflame. there was a struggle for liberation, for freedom that this government could not control. >> the soweto uprising of 1976 was a privatal moment in south african history, and mandela realize it had. >> reporter: in prison mandela reads about and is encouraged by the uprising. >> all of the work that he had done for all of these years was actually now bearing fruit, and that there was a revolutionary environm
are helping to assure that that kid over there who's not my kid has a chance at a good education or that guy over there who i'm not related to has a chance at a decent job and a decent retirement, i'm going to be better off. i'm going to be living in a society that is more cohesive and is going to create the kind of future for our kids that were all want. and that more than anything is at the core of the debate that i've been having with the republican party over the last several years. it's not just the details of the affordable care act or, you know, the minimum wage. because as i said yesterday in the speech, if you've got better ideas for achieving the same goal, put them out there. i'm not wedded to one particular way of doing things. but the central argument i have is we do have an obligation to each other. and there's some things we can do together. in fact, the big challenges we have whether it's immigration, climate change, an economy that works for everybody, improving our education system, making college more affordable, competing in the world economy, dealing with questions of wa
declared that separate educational facilities are unequal, south africa codified it expris sit ri for their nation. separate everything. everything assigned to different races. and the best of everything reserved for the white minority. people classified as colored. for a while, they had a right to vote specifically for white people to represent them. only the white minority had the vote in the ends. and only the white minority had any say. 80% of the country lived entirely segregated and without representation under white rule. 80% of the country. by 1960, the demonstrations had started to zero in on those pass books, the laws that made your mere existence criminal if you were challenged by a white person as to what you were doing there. the best way to overthrow apartheid, just outside johannesburg somewhere between 5,000 and 7,000 people turned up and said they wanted to turn themselves in. thousands of people. they turned up and said that they all felt that they needed to be arrested, all 5,000 of them because they said they tid not have their passbooks. so they were turning t
the u.s. supreme court declared that separate educational facilities are inherently unequal, the year before we said, separate but equal was dead, south africa codified it, explicitly, for their nation. the apartness, the apartheid system of separate schools, separate hospitals, separate beaches, separate buses, separate park benches, separate everything, everything assigned to specific races, and the lion's share of everything, and of course, the best of everything, reserved only for the white minority. black people had no right to vote. people classified as "colored," for a while, they had a right to vote specifically for white people to represent them, but eventually that was stripped too. only the white minority had the vote in the end. only the white minority was represented in government and only the white minority had any say whatsoever of the affairs in the nation. 80% of the country lived entirely segregated and without representation under white rule. 80% of the country. and by 1960, the resistance to apartheid, the demonstrations against it, had started to zero in on those
declared that separate educational facilities are inherently unequal, the year before we said separate but equal was dead, they codified it for their nation, the apartness, the apartheid, separate park bench, separate everything. everything assigned to specific races, and the lion's share of everything and the best of everything reserved only for the white minority. black people had no right to vote. people classified as colored, for a while they had a right to represent specifically for white people to represent them. but eventually that was stripped too. only the white minority had the vote. only the white minority was represented in government and only the white minority had any say whatsoever in the affairs of the country. 80% of the country lived entirely segregated and without representation under white rule. 80% of the country. and by 1960, the resistance to apartheid, the demonstrations against it had started to zero in on those passbooks, the papers please laws which made your mere existence criminal if you were challenged by a white person as to what you were doing there. in
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)